Episode Night Owl and Morning Maggie

Synopsis

Fascinated by an owl in the backyard, Little J turns nocturnal with disastrous results.

Little J becomes nocturnal to watch a barking owl in the backyard. But the next day he’s exhausted – and falls asleep at ridiculous times and in strange places. Now it looks like he’s going to sleep through all the fun of the sleepover…

Ways of knowing and doing

AreaFor meAbout meBy me
My Country
  • Australian birds: Magpie and Barking Owl
  • Nocturnal animals, such as bats, the bilby and wombats
  • The habitats of animals and how they adapt to the environment.
  • The seasons and seasonal calendars
  • The night and day skies
  • Family & community connections to Country
  • Understand my emotions and how I react in different situations
  • Being curious and finding out about traditional knowledge, skills, and technologies
  • Australian birds and animals in my local environment
  • The behaviours of animals to protect their young
  • Life cycles of animals and their relationship to sustaining Country
  • Traditional games
  • Presenting and speaking about traditional and cultural artefacts
My Mob

Stories of the past:

  • The Dreaming and/or Bipo Bipo Taim (Before Before Time): animal totems, the night sky, the dawn and sunse
  • Personal and social Histories
  • Animal totems and their significance
  • Respect for Elders
  • Build confidence and resilience
  • Learn to question and gain knowledge, understanding and language skills
  • Be healthy

Learn Indigenous and non-Indigenous language and literacies:

  • Speaking, Spelling, Reading, Writing
  • Drawing, Painting, Dancing, Singing, Playing instruments
My School

Science:

  • Understand the natural world: identifynocturnal and diurnal birds and animals; their behaviours and habitats
  • The scientific inquiry process of questioning, testing and applying

Mathematics:

  • Counting, number, pattern, sequence, time, distance
  • Learn about time, to the half hour and quarter hour
  • The seasons, the calendar, and the night and day sky
  • Language: Use of recount, experiencing and retelling in oral and written formats
  • Literacy
  • Numeracy
  • Personal and social capability
  • Critical and creative thinking
  • Ethical understanding
  • Explore my local area/backyard to find nocturnal and diurnal birds and animals
  • Study the life cycle and behaviours of the magpie and the Barking Owl
  • Listen to and learn about Aboriginal cultures languages and histories, and Torres Strait Island cultures, languages and histories.
  • Identify and calculate time, seasons, life cycles

Scoping on Country

Scoping ideas for deeper learning experiences ‘on Country’ or ‘off Country

‘on Country’ is used as a socio/cultural term to represent the place we belong to.

For teachers who can take students out to local ancestral lands where they are ‘on Country’, there are activities they can do, even if their access to traditional knowledge may be limited.

For teachers who can’t take students out of the school grounds, there are activities that help the students consider and move towards a looser understanding of ‘our place’ that is not as strong as an identified Country but that encompasses observing, studying and engaging with the natural environment in the local area.

‘on Country’ (By Me): Discovering, observing, and creating

Excursion to bushland surrounding the school, local parkland, recognised Aboriginal bush reserve/waterways and/or Torres Strait Islander bush reserve/waterway or visit a local beach.

If the excursion is to enter a significant Aboriginal cultural site/area of importance and/or Torres Strait Islander cultural site/area of importance, seek permission from the recognised custodians/authorities to take photographs. Also, instruct participants that they can’t take or remove anything from a sacred site.

Map a journey from one place to another place:

  • Create a photo tour of your local ‘Country’, making a map and identifying where Australian animals, birds, insects and amphibians are located.
  • Observe the night sky, weather conditions and times for sunrise and sunset.
  • Become an ornithologist and study the birds on Country, where they feed, what they feed on, and how they survive.
  • Plant native flowers and flowering bushes to attract birds and bees.
  • Identify tracks of nocturnal animal activity and the prevalence of nocturnal birds.
  • Search the local area for other signs of animal life, such as anthills, nests, feathers, fur, or scat.
  • Talk to people who have lived in your area for a long time and find out what other animals and birds they have seen there, in the past.
  • Gather, taste and cook bush tucker, accompanied by an Indigenous food expert. Create a list of foods and bush tucker recipes.
  • Recognise the change of seasons and relationship to climate, flora and fauna behavior and length of day and night

Scoping off Country

Off Country (For Me): Questioning, identifying, comparing, collecting data

  • Create a presentation of sketches, photographed images, and recorded sounds from a tour ‘On Country’.
  • Design and create a poster supporting actions to preserve the environment and habitats of native animals.
  • Support the reduction of non-native animals from the environment.
  • Collect specimens of native bird feathers, and label and categorise them in a sketch diary.
  • Create a collage using leaves and bark found in the local area.
  • Learn the Aboriginal names and/or the Torres Strait islander names of various animals and birds found on Country.
  • Read and re-tell Aboriginal Dreaming stories and/or Torres Strait Islander Bipo Bipo Taim (Before Before Time) stories of the about the animals and spirits that inhabit the land and sky.
  • Design and make a mask to ward of swooping magpies; design two puppets, a magpie and a Barking owl, and perform a story about them.
  • Explore the meanings and symbolism of Aboriginal artworks and/or Torres Strait Islander artworks that include representations of birds and animals, the night sky, and the seasons.
  • Create artworks and stories that present an individual point of view about the local environment.
  • Learn how to calculate number and time using traditional ways of Aboriginal peoples and/or Torres Strait Islander peoples
  • Learn First language, in parallel with English language and literacy, to progress understanding and reflection about my World.
Legend: Mathematics, Science, Both, None

General Capabilities

Literacy
Comprehending texts through listening, reading and viewing
Composing texts through speaking, writing and creating
Text knowledge
Grammar knowledge
Word knowledge
Visual knowledge
Numeracy
Estimating and calculating with whole numbers
Recognising and using patterns and relationships
Using fractions, decimals, percentages, ratios and rates
Using spatial reasoning
Interpreting statistical information
Using measurement
ICT capability
Applying social and ethical protocols and practices when using ICT
Investigating with ICT
Creating with ICT
Communicating with ICT
Managing and operating ICT
Critical and creative thinking
Inquiring - identifying, exploring and organising information and ideas
Generating ideas, possibilities and actions
Reflecting on thinking and processes
Analysing, synthesising and evaluating reasoning and procedures
Personal and social capability
Self-awareness
Self-management
Social awareness
Social management
Ethical understanding
Understanding ethical concepts and issues
Reasoning in decision making and actions
Exploring values, rights, responsibilities
Intercultural understanding
Recognising culture and developing respect
Interacting and empathising with others
Reflecting on intercultural experiences and taking responsibility
Legend: Mathematics, Science, Both, None

Cross Curriculum Priorities

Country/Place
OI.1 Australia has two distinct Indigenous groups: Aboriginal Peoples and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, and within those groups there is significant diversity..
OI.2 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities maintain a special connection to and responsibility for Country/Place throughout all of Australia.
OI.3 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples have unique belief systems and are spiritually connected to the land, sea, sky and waterways.
Culture
OI.4 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander societies have many Language Groups.
OI.5 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples’ ways of life are uniquely expressed through ways of being, knowing, thinking and doing.
OI.6 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples have lived in Australia for tens of thousands of years and experiences can be viewed through historical, social and political lenses.
People
OI.7 The broader Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander societies encompass a diversity of nations across Australia.
OI.8 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples have sophisticated family and kinship structures.
OI.9 The significant contributions of Aboriginal Peoples and Torres Strait Islander Peoples in the present and past are acknowledged locally, nationally and globally.

Show

Year 2 Mathematics

5E's Inquiry approach

Through Little J & Big Cuz, Episode 13 ‘Night Owl and Morning Magpie’, students can investigate the following inquiry questions for Mathematics:

  • How do we measure and represent time? What are the units of measure related to time?
  • What past and present technologies have been used to measure time?

The 5Es: an inquiry approach

This teaching strategy has been designed from the 5Es Inquiry approach.

Description

Australian Curriculum, Mathematics F–10

From Foundation Year to Year 2, students begin to develop mathematics understanding, fluency, problem-solving and reasoning skills. The three content strands are Number and Algebra, Measurement and Geometry, and Statistics and Probability.

Year 2 proficiency strands include:

  • understanding includes connecting number calculations with counting sequences, partitioning and combining numbers flexibly and identifying and describing the relationship between addition and subtraction and between multiplication and division
  • fluency includes readily counting numbers in sequences, using informal units iteratively to compare measurements, using the language of chance to describe outcomes of familiar chance events and describing and comparing time durations
  • problem-solving includes formulating problems from authentic situations, making models and using number sentences that represent problem situations, and matching transformations with their original shape
  • reasoning includes using known facts to derive strategies for unfamiliar calculations, comparing and contrasting related models of operations and creating and interpreting simple representations of data.

Content descriptions and codes, Year 2, Mathematics, Australian Curriculum

Number and Algebra

Number and place value

  • Investigate number sequences, initially those increasing and decreasing by twos, threes, fives and tens from any starting point, then moving to other sequences - (ACMNA026)
  • Explore the connection between addition and subtraction - (ACMNA029)
  • Recognise and represent multiplication as repeated addition, groups and arrays - (ACMNA031)

Measurement and Geometry

Using units of measurement

  • Tell time to the quarter hour, using the language of 'past' and 'to' - (ACMMG039)
  • Name and order months and seasons - (ACMMG040)
  • Use a calendar to identify the date and determine the number of days in each month - (ACMMG041)
                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Australian Curriculum v8.3, Mathematics F–10

“© Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA) 2010 to present, unless otherwise indicated. This material was downloaded from the Australian Curriculum website (Website) (accessed [insert date]) and [was][was not] modified. The material is licensed under CC BY 4.0. Version updates are tracked on the Curriculum version history page of the Australian Curriculum website.

ACARA does not endorse any product that uses the Australian Curriculum or make any representations as to the quality of such products. Any product that uses material published on this website should not be taken to be affiliated with ACARA or have the sponsorship or approval of ACARA. It is up to each person to make their own assessment of the product, taking into account matters including, but not limited to, the version number and the degree to which the materials align with the content descriptions (where relevant). Where there is a claim of alignment, it is important to check that the materials align with the content descriptions (endorsed by all education Ministers), not the elaborations (examples provided by ACARA).”

Example questions

Begin any activity listed below by viewing Little J & Big Cuz, Episode 13 ‘Night Owl and Morning Maggie’.

After viewing, ask students questions about the episode to enhance their screen literacy. Direct questions so that students develop a full range of possible inquiries. For example:

  • Were your predictions about the episode correct? What surprised you about the episode?
  • When did Little J hear the Barking Owl? What did he think it was? Was that a reasonable thought?
  • Why hadn’t Little J heard the Barking Owl before? What did Nana say about it?
  • What happens to Little J when he tries to be nocturnal? What does this tell us about sleep?
  • What does Little J learn about magpie? Do we see changes in different animals in different seasons?

Themes

Themes that relate to Year 2, Mathematics and are associated with Episode 13 ‘Night Owl and Morning Maggie’ include:

  • time
  • living things
  • seasons.

Education resources K–2

Engage


Themes
Time

Explore


Themes
Seasons

Explain


Themes
Time

Elaborate


Themes
Time

Evaluate


Themes
Time


Show

Foundation Mathematics

5E's Inquiry approach

 Through Little J & Big Cuz, Episode 13 ‘Night Owl and Morning Magpie’, students can investigate the following inquiry questions for Mathematics:

  • How do we measure and represent time? In what ways did people invent ways of telling time?
  • What is day and night? How do day and night affect human and animal activity?
  • What are the different ways that we can observe weather and seasonal cycles?

The 5Es: an inquiry approach

 This teaching strategy has been designed from the 5Es Inquiry approach.

Description

Australian Curriculum, Mathematics F–10

From Foundation Year to Year 2, students begin to develop mathematics understanding, fluency, problem-solving and reasoning skills. The three content strands are Number and Algebra, Measurement and Geometry, and Statistics and Probability.

Foundation Year proficiency strands include:

  • understanding includes connecting names, numerals and quantities
  • fluency includes readily counting numbers in sequences, continuing patterns and comparing the lengths of objects
  • problem-solving includes using materials to model authentic problems, sorting objects, using familiar counting sequences to solve unfamiliar problems and discussing the reasonableness of the answer
  • reasoning includes explaining comparisons of quantities, creating patterns and explaining processes for indirect comparison of length

Content descriptions and codes, Foundation Year, Mathematics, Australian Curriculum

Number and Algebra

Number and place value

  • Establish understanding of the language and processes of counting by naming numbers in sequences, initially to and from 20, moving from any starting point - (ACMNA001)
  • Represent practical situations to model addition and sharing - (ACMNA004)

Measurement and Geometry

Using units of measurement

  • Compare and order duration of events using everyday language of time - (ACMMG007)
  • Connect days of the week to familiar events and actions - (ACMMG008)
                                                                                                                                                                                                               Australian Curriculum v8.3, Mathematics F–10

“© Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA) 2010 to present, unless otherwise indicated. This material was downloaded from the Australian Curriculum website (Website) (accessed [insert date]) and [was][was not] modified. The material is licensed under CC BY 4.0. Version updates are tracked on the Curriculum version history page of the Australian Curriculum website.

ACARA does not endorse any product that uses the Australian Curriculum or make any representations as to the quality of such products. Any product that uses material published on this website should not be taken to be affiliated with ACARA or have the sponsorship or approval of ACARA. It is up to each person to make their own assessment of the product, taking into account matters including, but not limited to, the version number and the degree to which the materials align with the content descriptions (where relevant). Where there is a claim of alignment, it is important to check that the materials align with the content descriptions (endorsed by all education Ministers), not the elaborations (examples provided by ACARA).”

Example questions

Begin any activity listed below by viewing Little J & Big Cuz, Episode 13 ‘Night Owl and Morning Maggie’:

After viewing, ask students questions about the episode to enhance their screen literacy. Direct questions so that students develop a full range of possible inquiries. For example:

  • Were your predictions about the episode correct? What surprised you about the episode?
  • When did Little J hear the Barking Owl? What did he think it was? Was that a reasonable thought?
  • Why hadn’t Little J heard the Barking Owl before? What did Nana say about it?
  • What happens to Little J when he tries to be nocturnal? What does this tell us about sleep?
  • What does Little J learn about magpie? Do we see changes in different animals in different seasons?

Themes

Themes that relate to Foundation level, Mathematics and are associated with Episode 13 ‘Night Owl and Morning Maggie’ include:

  • time
  • number

Education resources K–2

Engage


Themes
Time

Explore


Themes
Time

Explain


Themes
Time

Elaborate


Themes
Number

Evaluate


Themes
Number


Show

Year 2 Science

5E's Inquiry approach

Through Little J & Big Cuz, Episode 13 ‘Night Owl and Morning Maggie’, students can investigate the following inquiry questions for Year 2 Science:

  • How do living things change and grow?
  • What changes occur as immature animals grow up?
  • How does the environment, including the weather, affect living things?
  • How can the cycle of seasons be represented?

The 5Es: an inquiry approach

This teaching strategy has been designed from the 5Es Inquiry approach.

Description

Australian Curriculum, Science F–10

From Foundation Year to Year 2, students begin to develop science knowledge, understanding and skills.

Year 2 students:

  • observe, predict, organise and compare data to reveal patterns about phenomena, such as growth and change in living things
  • describe the components of simple systems
  • show how objects and materials interact through direct manipulation
  • count and measure observable phenomena to organise into tables that show patterns
  • explore the use of Earth’s resources, particularly the flow of matter and uses for water.

Content descriptions and codes, Year 2, Science, Australian Curriculum

Science Understanding: Biological Sciences

  • Living things grow, change and have offspring similar to themselves - (ACSSU030)

Science as a Human Endeavour: Nature and development of science

  • Science involves observing, asking questions about, and describing changes in, objects and events - (ACSHE034)
  • People use science in their daily lives, including when caring for their environment and living things - (ACSHE035)

Science Inquiry Skills

Questioning and predicting

  • Pose and respond to questions, and make predictions about familiar objects and events - (ACSIS037)

Planning and conducting

  • Participate in guided investigations to explore and answer questions - (ACSIS038)

Processing and analysing data and information

  • Use a range of methods to sort information, including drawings and provided tables and through discussion, compare observations with predictions - (ACSIS040)

Evaluating

  • Compare observations with those of others - (ACSIS041)

Communicating

  • Represent and communicate observations and ideas in a variety of ways - (ACSIS042)
                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Australian Curriculum v8.3, Science F–10

“© Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA) 2010 to present, unless otherwise indicated. This material was downloaded from the Australian Curriculum website (Website) (accessed [insert date]) and [was][was not] modified. The material is licensed under CC BY 4.0. Version updates are tracked on the Curriculum version history page of the Australian Curriculum website.

ACARA does not endorse any product that uses the Australian Curriculum or make any representations as to the quality of such products. Any product that uses material published on this website should not be taken to be affiliated with ACARA or have the sponsorship or approval of ACARA. It is up to each person to make their own assessment of the product, taking into account matters including, but not limited to, the version number and the degree to which the materials align with the content descriptions (where relevant). Where there is a claim of alignment, it is important to check that the materials align with the content descriptions (endorsed by all education Ministers), not the elaborations (examples provided by ACARA).”

Example questions

Teaching and Learning ideas, Science, Year 2

Begin any activity listed below by viewing Little J & Big Cuz, Episode 13 ‘Night Owl and Morning Maggie’.

  • After viewing the episode, ask students questions to enhance their screen literacy. Direct questions so that students develop a full range of possible inquiries. For example:Were your predictions about the episode correct? What surprised you about the episode?
  • When did Little J hear the Barking Owl? What did he think it was? Was that a reasonable thought?
  • Why hadn’t Little J heard the Barking Owl before? What did Nana say about it?
  • What happens to Little J when he tries to be nocturnal? What does this tell us about sleep?
  • What does Little J learn about magpie? Do we see changes in different animals in different seasons?

Themes

Themes that relate to Year 2 Science and are associated with Episode 13 ‘Night Owl and Morning Maggie’ include:

  • living things.

Education resources K–2

Engage


Themes
Fauna (Birds)

Explore


Themes
Day and Night

Explain


Themes
Fauna (Birds)

Elaborate


Themes
Fauna (Birds)

Evaluate


Themes
Fauna (Birds)


Show

Year 1 Mathematics

5E's Inquiry approach

Through Little J & Big Cuz, Episode 13 ‘Night Owl and Morning Magpie’, students can investigate the following inquiry questions for Mathematics:

  • How do we measure and represent time? In what ways did people invent ways of telling time?
  • How did present time-keeping evolve?
  • What past and present technologies have been used to tell the time?

The 5Es: an inquiry approach

This teaching strategy has been designed from the 5Es Inquiry approach.

Description

Australian Curriculum, Mathematics F–10

From Foundation Year to Year 2, students begin to develop mathematics understanding, fluency, problem-solving and reasoning skills. The three content strands are Number and Algebra, Measurement and Geometry, and Statistics and Probability.

Year 1 proficiency strands include:

  • understanding includes connecting names, numerals and quantities, and partitioning numbers in various ways
  • fluency includes readily counting number in sequences forwards and backwards, locating numbers on a line and naming the days of the week
  • problem-solving includes using materials to model authentic problems, giving and receiving directions to unfamiliar places, using familiar counting sequences to solve unfamiliar problems and discussing the reasonableness of the answer
  • reasoning includes explaining direct and indirect comparisons of length using uniform informal units, justifying representations of data and explaining patterns that have been created.

Content descriptions and codes, Year 1, Mathematics, Australian Curriculum

Number and Algebra

Number and place value

  • Develop confidence with number sequences to and from 100 by ones from any starting point. Skip count by twos, fives and tens starting from zero - (ACMNA012)
  • Recognise, model, read, write and order numbers to at least 100. Locate these numbers on a number line - (ACMNA013)

Measurement and Geometry

Using units of measurement

  • Tell time to the half hour - (ACMMG020)
  • Describe duration using months, weeks, days and hours - (ACMMG021)

Location and transformation

  • Give and follow directions to familiar locations - (ACMMG023)
                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Australian Curriculum v8.3, Mathematics F–10

“© Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA) 2010 to present, unless otherwise indicated. This material was downloaded from the Australian Curriculum website (Website) (accessed [insert date]) and [was][was not] modified. The material is licensed under CC BY 4.0. Version updates are tracked on the Curriculum version history page of the Australian Curriculum website.

ACARA does not endorse any product that uses the Australian Curriculum or make any representations as to the quality of such products. Any product that uses material published on this website should not be taken to be affiliated with ACARA or have the sponsorship or approval of ACARA. It is up to each person to make their own assessment of the product, taking into account matters including, but not limited to, the version number and the degree to which the materials align with the content descriptions (where relevant). Where there is a claim of alignment, it is important to check that the materials align with the content descriptions (endorsed by all education Ministers), not the elaborations (examples provided by ACARA).”

Example questions

Begin any activity listed below by viewing Little J & Big Cuz, Episode 13 ‘Night Owl and Morning Maggie’.

After viewing, ask students questions about the episode to enhance their screen literacy. Direct questions so that students develop a full range of possible inquiries. For example:

  • Were your predictions about the episode correct? What surprised you about the episode?
  • When did Little J hear the Barking Owl? What did he think it was? Was that a reasonable thought?
  • Why hadn’t Little J heard the Barking Owl before? What did Nana say about it?
  • What happens to Little J when he tries to be nocturnal? What does this tell us about sleep?
  • What does Little J learn about magpie? Do we see changes in different animals in different seasons?

Themes

Themes that relate to Year 1, Mathematics and are associated with Episode 13 ‘Night Owl and Morning Maggie’ include:

  • time
  • number and pattern
  • location.

Education resources K–2

Engage


Themes
Time

Explore


Themes
Time

Explain


Themes
Number & pattern

Elaborate


Themes
Location

Evaluate


Themes
Number & pattern


Show

Year 1 Science

5E's Inquiry approach

Through Little J & Big Cuz, Episode 13 ‘Night Owl and Morning Maggie’, students can investigate the following inquiry questions for Year 1 Science:

  • Why do living things live where they live?
  • Why are animals nocturnal and diurnal?
  • What is night and day?
  • How can people observe the stars?

The 5Es: an inquiry approach

This teaching strategy has been designed from the 5Es Inquiry approach.

Description

Australian Curriculum, Science F–10

From Foundation Year to Year 2, students begin to develop science knowledge, understanding and skills.

Year 1 students:

  • learn that their observations can be organised to reveal patterns, and that these patterns can be used to make predictions about phenomena
  • infer simple cause-and-effect relationships from their observations and experiences
  • link events and phenomena with observable effects and to ask questions observe changes that can be large or small and happen quickly or slowly
  • explore the properties of familiar objects and phenomena, identifying similarities and differences.
  • value counting as a means of comparing observations, and are introduced to ways of organising their observations.

Content descriptions and codes, Year 1, Science, Australian Curriculum

Science Understanding: Biological Sciences

  • Living things have a variety of external features - (ACSSU017)
  • Living things live in different places where their needs are met - (ACSSU211)

Science as a Human Endeavour: Nature and development of science

  • People use science in their daily lives, including when caring for their environment and living things - (ACSHE022)

Science Inquiry Skills

Questioning and predicting

  • Pose and respond to questions, and make predictions about familiar objects and events - (ACSIS024)

Planning and conducting

  • Participate in guided investigations to explore and answer questions - (ACSIS025)

Processing and analysing data and information

  • Use a range of methods to sort information, including drawings and provided tables and through discussion, compare observations with predictions - (ACSIS027)

Evaluating

  • Compare observations with those of others - (ACSIS213)

Communicating

  • Represent and communicate observations and ideas in a variety of ways - (ACSIS029)
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Australian Curriculum v8.3, Science F–10

“© Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA) 2010 to present, unless otherwise indicated. This material was downloaded from the Australian Curriculum website (Website) (accessed [insert date]) and [was][was not] modified. The material is licensed under CC BY 4.0. Version updates are tracked on the Curriculum version history page of the Australian Curriculum website.

ACARA does not endorse any product that uses the Australian Curriculum or make any representations as to the quality of such products. Any product that uses material published on this website should not be taken to be affiliated with ACARA or have the sponsorship or approval of ACARA. It is up to each person to make their own assessment of the product, taking into account matters including, but not limited to, the version number and the degree to which the materials align with the content descriptions (where relevant). Where there is a claim of alignment, it is important to check that the materials align with the content descriptions (endorsed by all education Ministers), not the elaborations (examples provided by ACARA).”

Example questions

Begin any activity listed below by viewing Little J & Big Cuz, Episode 13 ‘Night Owl and Morning Magpie’.

After viewing, ask students questions about the episode to enhance their screen literacy. Direct questions so that students develop a full range of possible inquiries. For example:

  • Were your predictions about the episode correct? What surprised you about the episode?
  • When did Little J hear the Barking Owl? What did he think it was? Was that a reasonable thought?
  • Why hadn’t Little J heard the Barking Owl before? What did Nana say about it?
  • What happens to Little J when he tries to be nocturnal? What does this tell us about sleep?

Themes

Themes that relate to Year 1 Science and are associated with Episode 13 ‘Night Owl and Morning Maggie’

  • living things
  • day and night

Education resources K–2

Engage


Themes
Seasons

Explore


Themes
Day and Night

Explain


Themes
Day and Night

Elaborate


Themes
Day and Night

Evaluate


Themes
Day and Night


Show

Foundation Science

5E's Inquiry approach

Through Little J & Big Cuz, Episode 13 ‘Night Owl and Morning Maggie’, students can investigate the following inquiry questions for Science:

  • Why do living things live where they live?
  • How is conservation of habitats linked to preserving animal populations?

The 5Es: an inquiry approach

This teaching strategy has been designed from the 5Es Inquiry approach.

Description

Australian Curriculum, Science F–10

From Foundation Year to Year 2, students begin to develop science knowledge, understanding and skills.  

Foundation Year students:

  • learn that observations can be organised to reveal patterns, and that these patterns can be used to make predictions about phenomena
  • observe and describe the behaviours and properties of everyday objects, materials and living things
  • explore change in the world around them, including weather, making things move and/or changing shape 
  • pose questions, make observations, and use their senses to gather different types of information.

Content descriptions and codes, Foundation Year, Science, Australian Curriculum

Science Understanding: Earth and space sciences

  • Living things have basic needs, including food and water - (ACSSU002)

Science as a Human Endeavour: Nature and development of science

  • Science involves observing, asking questions about, and describing changes in, objects and events - (ACSHE013)

Science Inquiry Skills

Questioning and predicting

  • Pose and respond to questions about familiar objects and events - (ACSIS014)

Planning and Conducting

  • Participate in guided investigations and make observations using the senses - (ACSIS011)

Processing and analysing data and information

  • Engage in discussions about observations and represent ideas - (ACSIS233)

Communicating

  • Share observations and ideas - (ACSIS012)
                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Australian Curriculum v8.3, Science F–10

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Example questions

Begin any activity listed below by viewing Little J & Big Cuz, Episode 13 ‘Night Owl and Morning Maggie’.

After viewing, ask students questions about the episode to enhance their screen literacy. Direct questions so that students develop a full range of possible inquiries. For example:

  • Were your predictions about the episode correct? What surprised you about the episode?
  • When did Little J hear the Barking Owl? What did he think it was? Was that a reasonable thought?
  • Why hadn’t Little J heard the Barking Owl before? What did Nana say about it?
  • What happens to Little J when he tries to be nocturnal? What does this tell us about sleep?

Themes

Themes that relate to Foundation Year Science and are associated with Episode 13 ‘Night Owl and Morning Maggie’ include:

  • living things
  • habitat
  • change.

Education resources K–2

Engage


Themes
Habitat

Explore


Themes
Habitat

Explain


Themes
Habitat

Elaborate


Themes
Living things

Evaluate


Themes
Living things